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It’s been 45 years since former President Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law in the Philippines. Many Filipinos suffered during this period: the rampant violence, the government abuses, the fight for freedom. Many risked their lives and lost their loved ones in the process. Today, many of us have forgotten these times. We tend to take the issue of martial law lightly and quickly conclude without reviewing our past. In these changing times, we must remind ourselves of this period in our history, study and reflect it – in order for us not to repeat our mistakes. Here are 12 books that tell stories about martial law in our country:

  1. “Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage” by Jose F. Lacaba
    “Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage” by Jose F. Lacaba, 2017 revised edition.

    A compilation of on-the-spot reports on the First Quarter Storm first published in the Philippine Free Press and the Asia-Philippines Leader, Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage is a useful manual for mass media students and practitioners working in the so-called New Journalism or literary journalism.

    “Of our journalists, one of the most able in the new style is Jose F. Lacaba. As TV and newsreel do, he puts you right on the scene… He communicates the emotion, even the meaning of what’s happening without having to spell it out.” – Quijano de Manila

    This book is divided into three parts. Stories of

    Available for P450 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  2. “Dekada ’70” by Lualhati Bautista
    “Dekada ’70” by Lualhati Bautista

    “Definitely a political novel. More than the individual story of a mother watching her sons grow and plunge into real life, Dekada ’70 is an indictment of martial law, and here, Lualhati minces no worlds.” – Female Forum, November 21, 1983

    Available for P250 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  3. “Tibak Rising” edited by Ferdinand Llanes
    “Tibak rising: Activism in the Days of Martial Law” edited by Ferdinand Llanes

    Columnist and teacher Michael L. Tan writes, ” The Tibak stories remind us there’s more to transformation than slogans and the grim and determined politics of the streets… We find friendships and camaraderie built even in detention, not just among prisoners but with the soldiers… (These stories) remind us that history and memory-making, so vital for the nation to move forward as a people, is not just of commemorating people, but also of reclaiming places weher people lived, struggled, and died.”

    Available for P495 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  4. “To Suffer Thy Comrades” by Robert Francis Garcia
    “To Suffer Thy Comrades” (New revised edition) by Robert Francis Garcia
    Winner of the 2001 National Book Award, To Suffer Thy Comrades is a brutally honest, meticulously researched, and brilliantly written account of one of the CPP-NPA internal anti-infiltration operations—the infamous Oplan Missing Link—written by a former cadre himself who, like his comrades and other purge victims and survivors, seeks healing and justice while striving to move on from the tragedy.
    Vivid, shocking, action-packed, and at the same time heartrending and thought-provoking, this book takes us into the guerrilla headquarters, into the lives of the zealous (mostly young) people who became part of the revolutionary movement in the turbulent Martial Law era, and into the chaos and paranoia that later enveloped the revolutionary group and caused it to implode.

    Available for P450 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  5. “Killing Time in a Warm Place” by Jose Dalisay, Jr.
    “Killing Time in a Warm Place” by Jose Dalisay, Jr.

    This is a novel about growing up in the Philippines during the Marcos years. Told through the voice of Noel Ilustre Bulaong, the narrative travels through familiar social and literary territory: the coconut groves of Bulaong’s childhood, Manila’s hovels, the Diliman commune, “UG” safehouses, martial law prisons, the homes and offices of the petite-bourgeoisie.

    Available for P225 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  6. “Subversive Lives: A Family Memoir of the Marcos Years” by Susan F. Quimpo and Nathan Gilbert Quimpo
    “Subversive Lives” by Susan Quimpo and Nathan Gilbert Quimpo

    “Written as a family history this book furnishes us with powerful testimonies on the era of Ferdinand Marcos and Jose Ma. Sison, along with narratives on the vicissitudes of the revolutionary movement. Each Quimpo sibling bears witness to the events they and others did so much to shape. From aborted attempts to smuggle weapons for the NPA to heady times organizing ‘spontaneous uprisings’” and general strikes in Mindanao, from the cruel discovery of the cause of one brother’s death at the hands of a kasama(comrade) to the near hallucinatory tales of imprisonment and torture at the hands of the military, these stories remind us of the personal costs and the daily heroism of those who joined the movement… To read these accounts, each so rich and distinctive in its tone, is to hear the rhythm of the revolution.”  -From the Foreword by Vicente L. Rafael

    Available for P695 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  7. “Gun Dealers’ Daughter” by Gina Apostol
    “Gun Dealers’ Daughter by Gina Apostol

    “In this fearlessly intellectual novel, Gina Apostol takes on the keepers of official memory and creates a new, atonal anthem that defies single ownership… perception is always in question, and memory and the Filipino identity are turned inside out.” -Eric Gamalinda, author of Empire of Memory

    Available for P395 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  8. “Empire of Memory” by Eric Gamalinda
    “Empire of Memory” by Eric Gamalinda

    Two friends are hired by Marcos to rewrite Philippine history. Their mission: to make it appear that Marcos was destined to rule the country in perpetuity. Working from an office called the Agency for the Scientific Investigation of the Absurd, they embark on a journey that will take them across a surreal panorama of Philippine politics and history, and in the process question their morals and beliefs.

    This landscape includes mythological sultans, mercenaries, the Beatles, a messianic Amerasian rock star, faith healers, spies, torturers, sycophants, social climbers, sugar barons, millenarian vigilantes, generals and communists—the dizzying farrago of lovers and sinners who populate the country’s incredible story. By the end of their project—and this breathtaking novel—the reader emerges from a world

    that is at once familiar and unbelievable. It’s what real life might look like if both heaven and hell were crammed into it, and all its creatures were let loose.

    Available for P450 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  9. “SDK: Militant but Groovy” by Soliman M. Santos Jr. and Paz Verdades M. Santos, eds.
    “SDK: Militant but Groovy” by Soliman M. Santos Jr. and Paz Verdades M. Santos, eds.

    In his now classic essay “The Tide of History,” SDK stalwart Vivencio Jose describes what he calls a narrative of liberation thus, “It was patently clear that the unchanging official historical narrative was no longer feasible, they had to create their own narrative. With high hopes that praxis would disclose its discourse, they embarked on a journey of discovery and struggle. They did not look back even when the violent pull and push of reality tore the last shred of their innocence. The journey changed their lives forever. They thus created their part of the narrative of human liberation.”

    Available for P100 online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  10. “Seven in the Eye of History” edited by Asuncion David-Maramba
    “Seven in the Eye of History” edited by Asuncion David-Maramba

    Eugenia Apostol, Corazon Aquino, Macli-ing Dulag, Rosa Henson, Luis Jalandoni, Eduardo Quintero, and Jaime Cardinal Sin all found themselves in the “eye of history,” defining moments that changed or ended their lives.

    The essays are by Lorna Kalaw-Tirol, Vicente Tirol, Neni Sta. Romana Cruz, Adolfo Azcuna, Nestor Castro, Sheila Coronel, Angelito Santos, Fides Lim, Bienvenido Lumbera, Lita Hidalgo, Wilfrido Villacorta, Dulce Baybay, and Ferdinand Santos.

    Available for P100 online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  11. “Armando J. Malay: Guardian of Memory” by Marites N. Sison and Yvonne T. Chua
    “Armando J. Malay: Guardian of Memory” by Marites N. Sison and Yvonne T. Chua

    The feisty journalist, educator, and activist according to his own detailed memoir, and the recollection of family, friends, and colleagues. The book also contains many vignettes which capture the highlights of Philippine history from the 1940s to the 1990s.

    Available for P150 online at www.anvilpublishing.com

  12. “The Jupiter Effect” by Katrina Tuvera
    “The Jupiter Effect” by Katrina Tuvera

    This is the story of Kiko and Gaby, two martial-law babies who underwent political initiation during the Marcos years. The book poses questions about the Filipinos’ complicity in the Marcos dictatorship and portrays many compromises that are still present in the current Philippine politics.

    Available for P215 at National Book Store and Powerbooks Store branches and online at www.anvilpublishing.com

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